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The present introductory seminar is designed to orient you to being a graduate student in a university. This, of course, is an extension of your previous college work as an undergraduate, but there are significant differences. As a graduate student, you will be expected to be more independent in your scholarship and to do work that shows more originality than was required as an undergraduate. You will learn to pursue knowledge on your own and to critically evaluate information as you discover it. In short, you will learn how to learn, how to think and how to create.


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All MLS students read and write reports on a series of interdisciplinary texts as common background for the MLS program. The readings in this enrollment are designed to reinforce an interdisciplinary approach to graduate studies as well as lay the foundation for your interdisciplinary enrollments and future thesis or project research.


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This class develops and expands the concepts introduced in Interdisciplinary Foundations. We will underscore the conceptual frames for thinking about inquiry and research. It will do this by exploring recent issues, theoretical approaches and professional concerns specific to the area of study in which you will be doing research.


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This course is designed to acquaint students with qualitative research methods in Interdisciplinary Studies. By the end of the course, the student will be familiar with the most common forms of qualitative research, including how to design a study, ethical issues that must be recognized and appropriately addressed, and analysis of qualitative data.


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Variable topic course. May be repeated with change of content. Maximum credit nine hours.

Public charities rely heavily on government and private grants for their survival. According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics (2011), of the $1.59 trillion in total revenue for nonprofits in the United States, 22% comes from contributions and grants. The Foundation Center (2012) reported $46.9 billion in giving by foundations in 2011. Though these numbers seem large, the need is much greater. The competition for grants is fierce, and with the variety of foundations and their numerous requirements, most nonprofit agencies have hired full-time fundraisers just to keep up with the competition. This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in searching for grants and developing successful grant proposals. Students will be introduced to the principles of fundraising, goal setting, performance evaluation, stewardship and relationship building, and grant research.

Syllabus

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, LSTD 5013, and completion of first concentration core class; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Development of creative or applied research project related to your degree program focus of study. The final form will vary according to topic and purpose of the project but must include a written component. Comprehensive examination over the research project is required. (F, Sp, Su)

An in-depth study of literature on a topic related to the student’s program of study; variable content. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, LSTD 5013, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Research and writing of a thesis for completion of CLS graduate degrees. (F, Sp, Su)

The master of liberal studies - administrative leadership program educates you for success in the 21st century by combining the broad elements of interdisciplinary study with an in-depth understanding of leadership. The very qualities that today’s employers seek are those of leadership within the context of creative and flexible thinking.


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How you understand or explain a phenomenon – whether it be a static thing like a painting or a set of dynamic events such as group behavior in an organization – determines how you act. Your actions are then interpreted by many different people, and each will attach to it a unique explanation or interpretation.


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In this course, students will examine ethical dimensions of leadership from many perspectives and create case studies and a final project that applies the concepts learned in the course. Ethics, in the broadest sense, refers to how we relate to other people, animals, the environment and ourselves in terms of what we should do. The study of ethics is more than just memorizing a moral code or religious doctrine; it enables the student to examine ethical problems from several important perspectives, adequately frame problems for optimal understanding and practice ethical reasoning in developing practical solutions. These skills are essential in human life. The more honed an individual becomes in making good and ethically sound judgments, the more valuable they become in the decision-making process of any organization.


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This course examines positive and negative aspects of leadership in terms of traits, behaviors, styles, personality function, situational variables, motivational factors, values and self-understanding. Students will explore theories and research on others who function in leadership roles as well as engage in their own self-analysis of key variables related to leadership. The coursework will facilitate the student’s ability to be a more effective leader through greater self-awareness and through strategies to promote constructive relationships in groups or organizations.


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This course is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and attributes of poor management and leadership (also referred to as “stupidity” by author R. Sternberg and others in his anthology), consideration of a proposed theory of the attributes of “stupidity,” and how “stupidity” relates to human decisions and behavior. We explore from a cognitive psychology perspective the attributes of “stupidity” and from an economist’s perspective the attributes of social decision-making and the unintended consequences of those decisions.


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Information management systems are a significant issue in today’s organizational settings, both in military and private organizations. The significance of this issue can be seen in the success and/or failure of many organizations in their ability to adapt to external conditions. Organizations adapt to their external environment, or failing that, become ineffective and potentially dissolve. Organizations can no longer presume they will last forever, particularly when environmental changes occur at high speed. This course discusses the fundamental issues in the management of information, the ways people in organizations exchange information, and ultimately, how effective sharing of information leads to effective problem solving.

Syllabus

Motivation is often defined as the substance that “energizes behavior,” and when studying motivation, researchers are concerned with not only what energizes and directs behavior but also with how to maintain and sustain motivation. In this course, students will examine various motivational theories and their application in work and leadership. In other words, we will examine the set of energetic forces that originate both within, as well as beyond an individual’s being, to initiate work-related behavior, and to determine its form, direction, intensity and direction. Specifically, students will examine how needs, values, attitudes, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, goals, gender, culture and generations all influence motivation in work, communication and leadership styles.


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The trend in leadership studies is moving away from leader-centered theory to more integrated theory that includes the leader’s relationship with and influence on followers. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to an often understudied aspect of leadership – the role of the follower and the dynamics that result from followership. Students will learn about different theories and definitions of followership, different ways followers can be categorized, how followers often become subtle but influential leaders themselves and the role of followers in standing up for effective leadership or against ineffective or bad leadership.


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This course analyzes principles of leadership, using prominent examples drawn from history to discern patterns and test categories of and theoretical generalizations on leadership. The pertinent discussions aim to facilitate the understanding of leadership in different historical contexts. Consideration is given to success and failure, the relative importance of personality vs. circumstances, leadership characteristics and styles.


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This course explores women leaders and their influence on their societies as well as their contributions on a broader spectrum. Special attention is focused on how women leaders become change agents from different eras and what particular issues made them transformational leaders. The number of women leaders who have climbed to high level positions as heads of state, governmental bodies, administrators, and leaders of political parties and major organizations is limited. Successful women leaders are a diverse group and research shows they represent a wide range of varied and interesting personal, social and political backgrounds. We are interested in studying their leadership patterns, finding out what they accomplished and how their society was changed as a result of their transformational contributions.


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The master of arts administrative leadership option educates students for success in the 21st century by combining the broad elements of interdisciplinary study with an in-depth understanding of leadership. This third-in-a-series of courses dedicated to the principles of leadership focuses on the characteristics of leaders as individuals and, in particular, as individuals of faith for causes pertaining to social justice. We explore individuals from the major faith traditions including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism and Native American religion and investigate the ways in which faith and the particular constellation of life experiences and social situations have inspired leadership for the cause of social justice.


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This is a graduate level course that studies leadership, both uniformed and civilian, in the United States military from 1775 to 2000. It does this within the context of the evolution of American military from a small 18th century army and wooden ship-and-sail navy to the globe-dominating colossus of the late 20th century. This context includes the impact of technology, maturing military theory and the changing position of the United States in the world. All of this produced diverse leadership styles which are illustrated in the careers of military leaders such as George Washington, U. S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, David Farragut, John Pershing, Hap Arnold, George C. Marshall and many others.


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National Security Leadership is designed to prepare the student to operate within the environment of the U.S. national security system. It addresses the legislation that created the current national security system including the National Security Act of 1947, the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986, The Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Intelligence Reform Act of 2004, among others. It looks at the structure of the national security community and how it has evolved and addresses, through selected cases, how it has worked in practice. Capping the course is a simulation of a national security crisis decision and a major research paper.


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This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the nature of citizen soldiers, as well as the purpose and goals of the militia and National Guard organizations. The ongoing value to local, state and federal governments that the militia and National Guard have represented will be studied within the context of the overall American military ethos.  The success of these institutions will be illustrated through biographies of specific units and leaders who have made their mark on American history. This course aims, above all, to foster a greater appreciation of the contribution made by citizen soldiers to the security of the U.S. over nearly four centuries of history.

Financial Decision-Making for Leaders is an intensive inquiry into the decision-making functions of financial leadership in organizations. Based on concepts and financial ratios presented in the assigned readings, the course enables the student to understand and apply financial management and resource allocation skills through engagement in an Internet-delivered business simulation.


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Foundations in Coaching is a graduate-level survey course designed to familiarize you with the fundamental principles on which the field of professional coaching is built, to explore the core competencies required for professional coaching, to understand and analyze the methods used to facilitate the coaching process, to develop the basic skills required for effective practice as a professional coach, and to understand the guidelines that govern ethical coaching activities.

Syllabus

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet

This course provides a basic overview of research techniques, how those techniques have demonstrated success and failure of programs in American criminal justice, and what obstacles can prevent research findings from guiding actions by policy and program decision-makers.  The student will learn essential research terms and use, how they can assist understanding of existing program operations and administration of new programs, and what distinguishes sound research and analysis from questionable.  The student will also learn how to learn from what research shows to be failure and how to recognize and perhaps overcome obstacles to sound research and analysis in the policy arena.


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This course will enhance students understanding of criminological theory, focusing upon critical analysis of major theoretical perspectives, examining the historical, social and political context from which these theories emerged as well as the policy implications that have or can be derived from the theories.

Syllabus

The backbone of activity within criminal justice consists of policies and programs that have been developed to meet dynamic social needs.  Influenced by best practice, legal precedent, ethical considerations, and emerging crime trends, policies reflect the mission of the institution, its character, and its behavioral promise to the people it serves.  Insofar as criminal justice agencies operate in extremely fluid and often politically charged environments, developing relevant policies and planned initiatives are integral to organizational effectiveness.  Agencies live and die by their policies and careers are delicately balanced upon methods of creating sound actions by the employees of the agency.  In this course, students will learn the process of policy development from beginning to end: analyzing a problem; setting goals and objectives; designing a program or policy; action planning; implementing and monitoring; evaluating outcomes; and reassessing and reviewing. The course will also examine what research has shown to be effective crime control policy.

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Principles from the major ethical positions charted by Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Mill, Kant, and Rawls. Students will combine these principles with codes of practice and current case law, examine case vignettes and discuss the ethical components of each case.


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This course will survey the evolving field of victimology; from its preoccupation with the study of the victim as a co-active participant in crime, to the reemergence of the victim as the rightful focus of the criminal justice system and public policy.

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This course will expand upon the concept of community policing by providing a history of policing, examining the effectiveness of community partnerships, researching methods of solving problems within communities, and developing a strategy to implement community policing in a police department.

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Examines the origins, extent and consequences of racial and ethnic overrepresentation at all stages of contemporary American criminal and juvenile justice systems by utilizing recent research from both race theory and criminological theory.

This course will cover the particular issues and concerns associated with the management and operation of correctional facilities housing juvenile and aging inmates and the particular issues and concerns of public policy associated with appropriate punishment and treatment of juvenile and aging inmates.

Course Syllabus

Examines the origins, extent and consequences of class/social inequity at all stages of the contemporary American criminal and juvenile justice systems by using emergent research from both social inequity theory and criminology.

Provides an in-depth examination of women and crime, particularly in the United States, from a sociological perspective, focusing on theoretical explanations, women as offenders, women as victims of crime, and societal responses to female crime.

Syllabus

Gang formation, risk factors for joining gangs, and the efficacy of different types of prevention, intervention and interdiction policies. The historical backgrounds of gangs, drugs, and violence in America, as well as current issues related to these subjects, will be explored.

The life-course paradigm has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for understanding criminal behavior. This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of the life-course paradigm and its application to criminal justice policy.

In this course, students will learn about crime analysis and the use of the data gained to intelligently prevent and/or interdict crime. Specifically, students will demonstrate an understanding of the following: the role of the crime analyst; criminal analysis strategies; geographic information systems; the use of crime analysis to investigate property crimes; the use of crime analysis to investigate people crimes; the use of intelligence analysis; crime mapping.

Course Syllabus

Advanced studies in various criminal justice topics, offered under stated titles determined each semester by the instructor involved

In recent years, society has demanded a greater role of law enforcement in improving safety within the education systems of this nation. Increased police presence in public and private schools as well as institutions of higher learning has been met with both appreciation and skepticism. While there appears to be a definite need for increased safety and security in schools, there is great debate over the role police should play in schools even to the degree of whether or not police should even be present at all. Others call for police to be assigned to every school in America. There can be numerous pitfalls for any police officer or law enforcement agency attempting to police within the education environment.

This course of study will emphasize successful practices on policing within the education systems of our nation and offer instruction to both police and educators on cooperative approaches to making schools safer.

Syllabus

This course will explore the dynamics of leadership within the law enforcement context. We will examine the history and evolution of police administration, general leadership theories, management best practices, as well as contemporary issues confronting the profession. Conducted as a graduate seminar, Studies in Police Leadership will require that students step out of the passive learner role and take on primary responsibility for defining, researching, and reflecting on what it means to be a police leader. While we will study contemporary concepts, issues, and best practices, heavy emphasis will be placed on personal relevance and self-refection.

Syllabus

The criminal justice system is significantly impacted by substance abuse and drug crimes. This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of substance abuse trends in the United States, as well as in Oklahoma. In particular, it is important to understand the interrelationship between the substance abuse/dependency, substance abuse treatment and the criminal justice systems, as well as the serious consequences that are associated with how drug crimes are processed and how drug offenders are treated. This course will examine the historical problem of substance abuse/dependency and will focus on what effective policies/programs are in place to address it.

Syllabus

This course is an in-depth study of human trafficking – both labor trafficking and sex trafficking. We study human trafficking in select countries around the world, including the United States. In doing so, we address each country as both, a destination, and a departure point for the victims, and how the officials of a particular county respond to the victims.

Syllabus

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet

An interdisciplinary inquiry into the concepts of strategic planning and evaluation in the human and health services organizational settings. This will include a study of the strategic planning, implementation skills and the evaluation process; and of various models and approaches to designing and conducting strategic planning, including specific techniques for conducting environmental scans, SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats), strategic issue identification and strategy formulation.


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An interdisciplinary inquiry into cultural, social and other diversity issues that human and health services professionals will encounter in the process of providing services to their clients/patients. Exploration of how one’s cultural and social environment impacts one’s belief system. Successful delivery of service will depend upon the depth of understanding by personnel with regard to various belief systems.


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An interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature of ethics, especially in the context of multicultural health care; the kinds of moral problems within this landscape and how rational thinking can guide ethical thought in ways that address the challenges in health care policy and reform.


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This course explores multiple issues in the field of international health using a multidisciplinary perspective while including particular countries as examples. Students will be exposed to the perspective that human lives are affected by larger, societal level influences that often are beyond our immediate individual control. We will explore the ways in which structural level variables influence human health, including economic, historical, cultural, political and psychosocial factors. For example, we will see the role that war has played in the high rates of HIV/AIDS in Africa. Moreover, we will consider the influence of behavioral patterns on certain health outcomes.


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This course will introduce health and developmental issues pertaining to human geriatric populations, provide specific challenge areas for focusing on both problems and potential solutions, and highlight positive, recreational and self-actualizing activities and pursuits available to geriatric populations.


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This course is designed to examine the struggles in which persons with disabilities have been engaged and the barriers they have had to overcome as well as the barriers they continue to face in their quest to obtain the freedoms that persons without disabilities so freely enjoy. The following areas will be examined in some detail: disenfranchisement of persons with disabilities; attitudes toward persons with disabilities; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other legislative actions; disability rights movement; self-concept and self-esteem; role of family; and intervention strategies.


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Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet

This class is designed to prepare the students to meet the many challenges involved in operating a museum or in being an employee of a museum, and to understand museum management procedures. By successfully completing the course, the student will have a much better understanding of the complexity of the museum world and their place in that world. Moreover, they will be among the better-informed employees of any museum that hires them and will be able to adapt to new challenges and opportunities that may arise during their museum career.


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The course will explore the history and architecture of public museums from the late 18th century to the present. First, we will focus on the founding of the Louvre Museum, and then examine the classical model for the museum and museum building established in Europe and America in the 19th century and surviving into the 20th with institutions such as National Gallery of Art. The course will then look at assaults on and the evolution of the classical model by, for instance, the Museum of Modern Art and the art museums of Louis I. Kahn. We will then survey the numerous building projects of recent decades. The course will conclude with an examination of the major issues involved when a museum plans an expansion, selects an architect and determines the building program. The emphasis will be on art museums.


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This course is designed for students to understand top quality museum administration and management and to meet the challenges of directing and operating successful museums.


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Museums and their collections no longer stand apart from the communities where they reside and serve. Increasingly, museums are called upon to interact with society in new and sometimes unexpected ways. This evolving role has revised the traditional mission of museums and has called for new approaches and partnerships designed to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse and often demanding audience. Successful interaction with the public through exhibitions, educational programming, board development and volunteer associations not only strengthens the museum’s position of leadership within the community but also is key to gaining and maintaining the financial and moral support required for its very survival.


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In this course, we will consider the place of collections in the life of the museum. Just as the types of museums are varied, so is the nature of their collections. It is essential that the collections mesh with the goals and aspirations of the museum. For example, a science museum might have as its major purpose the active demonstration of scientific principles. An art museum might stress an aesthetic experience in which the object was paramount and the interpretation individual. A natural history museum might be a research institution as well as a place for educating and entertaining the public, so it would have a greater archival emphasis.


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Download the project Guidelines as a PDF
The project will enable the student to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between theory and application by successfully discussing this relationship in the concluding report.
  • Demonstrate the ability to formulate and/or carry out a specific museum project by successfully completing the described project.
  • Demonstrate the relationship between the specific project and broader museum goals and operations by successfully evaluating its effectiveness for museum operations.
  • Discuss the project within the context of the museum’s mission.
  • Interact with museum colleagues and other professional staff.

This course introduces students to the history and nature of small museums in the United States. Today, the majority of museums in the U.S. are small and they are a significant force in the cultural life of communities across the country. They offer unique experiences and issues in administration, finance, funding, staffing, program/exhibition development, community involvement, and partnership building.


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A central mission of museums is education and outreach. Because education plays such a vital role in museums, it is becoming increasingly necessary for museum professionals to have a strong foundation in museum education. This course serves as an introduction to museum education, including object-based learning, learning environments and learning theories, an understanding of which fosters the development of effective and motivating educational programs in museums. Although this course is intended to target those in the museum profession, this information can be applied toward the development of educational programs in other informal education fields.


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In 1957, Freeman Tilden of the National Park Service defined the concept of interpretation and pioneered its study and implementation in museums, parks and historic sites. Tilden’s definition in Interpreting Our Heritage states that interpretation is “an educational activity which aims to reveal meanings and relationships through the use of original objects, by firsthand experience, and by illustrative media, rather than simply to communicate factual information.” He described interpretation as a mode of communication intended to highlight information, emphasize the whole and ultimately provoke curiosity about a topic with a variety of media such as exhibits and programs.


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This course is designed for students to understand the representational history of Native cultures in museums and the dynamic collaboration between a museum and a culture to accomplish an authentic and respectful presentation today.


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Controversy and the World of Museum will examine some of the most controversial exhibitions of the 1990s, including shows about ethnicity, slavery, Freud, the Old West, the dropping of the atomic bomb by the Enola Gay, Jewish genocide and other cases from the museum history of the United States. Throughout the course, students also will be introduced with case studies from other countries, providing an international comparison on this subject. Controversies in this country did not simply begin and commonly reoccur in recent years, but, instead, controversies caused by art in America actually date back almost two centuries, and the provocations range from nudity to gigantism.

Syllabus

Variable topic course. May be repeated with change of content. Maximum credit six hours.

This course will examine the types of House Museum - As places of pilgrimage: where X lived; where Y happened; the BIG house. As architecture: built by A; last/first/oldest example. Students will be introduced to the challenges of conservation and interpretation within buildings that are themselves the exhibit and to the question of objective truth in a historical narrative. Community involvement/inclusion and diversity will be examined.


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This course introduces students to the field of historic preservation and helps them develop the ability to identify and document historic buildings, sites and structures. The readings are designed to acquaint the student with the range of philosophies, methodologies and “schools of thought” within the field of historic preservation and to introduce the student to its foremost practitioners who are teaching and researching in universities, working within government agencies or operating as independent preservation consultants.


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Overview of basic areas of museum exhibit development: content, layout, label writing and object display.  Students will be prepared to be a productive member of an exhibit team in a museum.


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This course examines current best practices in technology and how it relates to the world of museums. Students will examine ways and resources to connect with museum audiences through current technological trends, how to reach the 21st century crowd, and how to enhance their own productivity. The coursework will take students from awareness to potential implementation by assisting in creating their own technological plan.


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Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet

The master of science in prevention science program combines the broad elements of interdisciplinary study with an in-depth understanding of prevention science. This three-hour course provides a theoretical and practical basis for exploring the role of primary prevention, examining prevention practice as social action, analyzing prevention systems development, and evaluating the role of media advocacy and social marketing in effective prevention practice. This course is a concentration course for the M.S. in prevention science.


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The master of science in prevention science program combines the broad elements of interdisciplinary study with an in-depth understanding of prevention science. Students in this course will study lifespan issues, to include theories of human growth and development, brain development, impact of substances on the brain at various stages of development, transition periods and strategies to address service provision issues. At the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of prevention theory, the future of prevention and prevention science, and will be empowered to view individual and community prevention in a “lifespan” approach. This course is a core concentration course for the M.A. in Prevention Science.


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This course is designed to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills essential to the understanding and application of concepts, principles, processes and models to plan, design, implement and evaluate substance abuse prevention programs. Material covered in this course will demonstrate the logical link between utilizing data to identify priority issues, select “best fit” interventions and develop an appropriate evaluation design.


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Examination of the effects of drug use on the brain. Topics include physical and functional aspects of the brain, damage to the brain caused by drugs, and how brain damage appears as behavioral patterns that cause problems for individuals, their families, and society in general.


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Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 75 working hours (per credit hour) of field experience directly related to study focus in the Master's program is required. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su). See also Graduate Internship Packet